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Treating Bursitis and Tendinitis: “Would Armaid® work for me?”

Question

Client:

My massage therapist said to get this. I have bursitis and tendinitis. I had a frozen shoulder last June and still suffer from scar tissue built up on my right arm from texting and my neck has been super tight too. I go to a chiro and get massages a few times a mo. Would Armaid work for me? If I use my right arm more than a few mins to text or do anything repetitive - even eating w a heavy fork or drinking w a heavy glass it hurts in my shoulder and front of my upper arm. My left hand has been tight from using it more. Driving is hard on both arms. Thoughts?  

 

Answer

Terry:

Armaid use is great if you use as we instruct (using the Myofascial Trigger Point technique) to release all your arm muscles from their limited range of motion and chronic tightness issues: forearm muscles, biceps and triceps.

Armaid does not have the ability for upper back, neck or shoulder direct massage.

If your Massage Therapist says you need an Armaid, then you should get one and use it as instructed.   

Watch (increase) your water intake, stress levels and food types to minimize your acid pH levels.  You may feel much better perhaps if you did the Whole 30, 30 day anti-inflammatory diet to test where your issues really lay.  It sounds like you may be acidic.

 

Question

What makes you think I’m acidic and tell me more about the Whole 30?

Will arm aid aggravate my bursitis or tendinitis in my arms?

 

Answer

Inflammation is what causes tendinitis and bursitis.  The "itis" in both names means inflammation in Latin.   There are 2 ways to get that way:  1) Chronically over-tight muscles incessantly pull on their joint attachments due to overuse, or 2) consumption choices that can create an acidic state in your body tissues and joints.

Sometimes the inflammation is caused by tight overused muscles and sometimes it's caused through the effect of what you eat and lifestyle that effects your cellular tissue where your metabolism takes place.  A combination of both causes can often be the case.

Armaid and the technique we teach helps lengthen the muscles so the irritated tendon attachments are not pulled on. You don't massage the joints where the obvious pain is,  go to the tight sore 'trigger points' in the muscles to relieve the tight muscles that causes the muscle shortening issues that then pulls on the muscle/tendon attachments at the joints causing inflammation and irritation.  The Armaid tool allows the user to apply pro techniques to increase your functional range of motion.

As you may have come to know, foods and lifestyle choices can also create inflammation that can be said to increase the acidity of our blood and cellular tissue and result in tight muscles and painful joints. 

The Whole 30 one month program is designed to cut out inflammatory foods and liquids for 30 days so the body can have a 'reset' into a non-inflammatory state.  You then learn through careful reintroduction of foods how harmful many of your favorites really are.  My discovery was I was put into major pain in my joints and muscles if I ate white potatoes beyond one small serving.  Or even a small bit of sugar or simple carbs or refined flour based foods can trigger your reactions that you describe.

So Armaid will help but often there is an underlying state of cellular health that makes the massage and range of motion treatments not last as long of be as fruitful as they otherwise might when your muscles are relaxed, supple and have the correct pH of approx. 6.9.

May I suggest going online and search on acidity in the body caused by food and lifestyle and read about Whole 30 in helping to reset and balance and allow better choices.

Hope this information helps!

 

Question

This all started because I have a SLAP tear on my arm and some herniated discs in my neck. I see a chiro. Yes diet is important. I’ll check this all out but have you heard of any ideas for the SLAP tear residual pain I’m having if I do any aggravating things for more than a few mins?

 

Answer

SLAP tears can often occur when the bicep muscle is chronically too tight and chronically pulls on the tendon attachments at the labrum of the shoulder.

Using the Trigger Point therapy technique to increase range of motion in the bicep is what you need to do to relieve the irritation and soreness at the shoulder.

I don't have a SLAP video but the following will do the job for you.

See this video that shows how to use Armaid for the biceps in relationship to Tennis Elbow https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V2HvoahbOu0      See minute 1:33 to show you the position of Armaid in order to do your specific muscle relief for the shoulder attachment of the SLAP problem. Your job is to find the sore trigger points of your biceps and apply this technique. The rest is just you following the technique and becoming good at it.

You will be very surprised how loose your muscles will feel after a few days of use.

But, don't overdo it at first!   Go slow and only for 2-3 minutes, 2-3 times a day at first.    Maybe slow for several days at first so your muscles can get used to their increasing range of motion.

 

Question

I got the tear from a slip on a stair on a boat. It then froze my arm up as I had my dog pulling on me and the hundreds of emails and texts I do for my sales job too and I redid my kitchen and threw out 30 bags of things and then a few months later one morning it froze. I did PT but it made the pain worse. Had cortisone shots right when it happened so I could move it a bit for the PT. Chiro has been so so but I do almost have full range although it sticks at the very top and it’s been a year.

 

Answer

Your biceps sound really abused!!

If you are not receiving this technique from your therapist then find somebody who will do Active Release Therapy (ART) on you if you want someone to do it to you.

This is basically the same technique I teach you to do (trigger point therapy) to yourself using Armaid as the tool.

Also called tack-and-stretch, pin-and-stretch, myofascial active release. . . depending upon what medical person was taught by which PT or OT school or sports medicine facility.

Armaid Company


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